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GFR Greatest Hits - 2006 - 14 Tracks & DVD

Grand Funk Railroad - Greatest Hits - Deluxe Edition - CD + DVD

The highly anticipated Greatest Hits Deluxe Edition CD / DVD from the legendary rock group Grank Funk Railroad is here! This Deluxe Edition CD/DVD includes a Deluxe Edition full color booklet, CD of GFR's greatest hits and a DVD that includes never before seen footage of the band.

CD Song List:
1. We're An American Band
2. Time Machine
3. Walk Like A Man
4. Some Kind Of Wonderful
5. Shinin' On
6. Heartbreaker
7. Rock 'N Roll Soul
8. The Loco-Motion
9. Footstompin' Music
10. Mean Mistreater (live)
11. Take Me
12. Bad Time
13. I'm Your Captain
14. Inside Looking Out

Bonus DVD
Features footage from legendary gigs that the Funk Faithful have long clamored for, plus an unreleased promo film capturing the band during the pivotal recording sessions for the WE'RE AN AMERICAN BAND album.
* We're An American Band - original promo film, 1973
* Inside Looking Out - live on PBS' The Show. WITF TV, Hershey, PA, November 1969
* Some Kind of Wonderful - live at The Palace, Auburn Hills, MI, 4/20/97
* We're An American Band - live at The Palace, Auburn Hills, MI, 4/20/97
* I'm Your Captain - live at Shea Stadium, 7/9/71

Extended Versions - 2006 - 10 Tracks

Song List:
1. Footstompin' Music 4:44
2. The Loco-Motion 4:00
3. Some Kind Of Wonderful 4:36
4. Paranoid 7:21
5. Heartbreaker 7:41
6. Into The Sun 5:41
7. Time Machine 3:20
8. Inside Lookin' Out 8:17
9. Mean Mistreater 4:44
10. I'm Your Captain (Closer To Home) 8:22

Other Info
Recorded Live march 8 Chicago, IL., March 9 2003, Milwaukee, WI.


For The People - 2006 - 11 Tracks

1. For The People 4:06
2. Cry Baby 5:07
3. Nadean 3:50
4. Girl 4:27
5. You Know Who I Am 3:39
6. Same Ol’ Feelin'4:24
7. You,re My Girl 3:07
8. This Time 3:04
9. Waiting Here For You 4:05
10. Symptoms 3:42
11. Where Do We Go From Here 4:16

Other Info
Mark Farner - Guitar, Keyboards, Piano, Lead Vocals, Bg Vocals, Percussion
Lawrence Buckner - Bass, Bg Vocals
Hubert Crawford - Drums
Paul O’jibway - Keyboards, Bg Vocals, Sax, Percussion
Credits:
Beth Griffith - Bg Vocals
Bob Grundner - Percussion
Dennis Bellinger - Bg Vocals
Mark Pastoria - Keyboards
Rick Farner - Bg VocalsRecorded At: Alliance Recording Studio- (Aka The Swamp)
Parshallville, Mi 2005
Mixed, Over-dubs & Mastering: Harmonie Park Studios, Detroit, Mi 2005-2006 By: Mark Pastoria / Mark Farner
Engineered By: Mark Israel / Al Hurschman
Photo Credits: Rusty Russell- Nashville, Tn
Package Design: Dave Snyder For Missingink.com

 I want to start by saying that it has been since 1991 since Mark has released a new "FULL LENGTH" CD. I have been asking him since the first time I saw him play in 1992 at The Station in Wilkes-Barre Pa. He told me then it is coming out in April of 93....FLASH AHEAD 13 YEARS! We'll Mark delivered on his promise!
 
Track 1 "For The People:
The CD starts with the title track "For The People" and Let me tell you this song simply "KICKS ASS". From what I get from this song it is Mark's aggravation on the current status of what is left of this great country! Musically overall this song delivers the goods! Great guitar work and shows what a great guitar player Mark is! Hubert is absolutley sick on the drums on this track! This would be a great song for Mark to open his current shows with!
 
Track 2: Cry Baby: Love the keyboards on this track and Paul E O sounds incredible almost like a Hammond B3 effect! Marks Wah Wah "Cry Baby guitar pedal on this gives it a very Hendrix-ish feel! The message kind of reminds me of a couple going thru some turmoil trying to resolve some issues! Love the background vocals as well!
 
Track 3: Nadene: This track has a very poppy feel to it...Very clean guitar work on the rhythm and I love the sound of the hook on the guitar and solo. Again Background vocals sound superb! This song has that "bouncing ball" theory! This could be on Adult Contemporary Mainstream Radio today! If Hall and Oates can do it you can too Mark! The song is basically about a man who cannot forget a woman!
 
Track 4: Girl: This is what I have been waiting for! I have always loved ballads in general! But I have always loved Marks ballads! This is the area where Mark "EXCELS". He is a true balladeer! Marks vocals are phenomenal! Just a great true love song! Beth Griffins backgrounds adds a whole new element! The harmonies are right on! The solo in song blew me away for a slow song it kinda sounds like a "Eddie Van Halen" Eruption solo! Truly amazing! NUFF SAID!
 
Track 5: You Know Who I Am: I get a lot of mixed messages from this song..Could this be the GREAT "I AM" who Mark is singing about. This song reminds me the most of Marks solo Christian stuff from the "Wake Up" era. Very clean sounding song overall. I know who "I AM " is!
 
Track 6: Same Ol' Feelin: This Track Mark offered as a free MP3 download on his website before releasing the record. This song reminds me the most of Grand Funk! Just the heaviness of it! Great Rock N Roll sing along song about people rising up and making a difference!
 
Track 7: You're My Girl: This song has a great Motown feel to it with Paul E O's Sax work and Marks vocal prevailing! I really like Marks vocal inflection on this when he says "You will always be mine" and drags out the "Mine". I assume this is Mark's tribute to his wife ! Just a great song about finding true love!
 
Track 8:This Time: Another songs about trying to reinstate a relationship and get it back! Kind of reminds me of Airborne Ranger sounding song! Huberts drums work on this is great! This could easily become  a staple for the Farner shows!
 
Track 9: Waiting Here For You:
 I have to emphasize this is  the strongest track on the CD in my opinion!

 
This song starts out with a haunting keyboard making you want to listen! I have not figured what Mark was writing about...BUT it can mean many things...I am thinking an Indian God or God or as someone suggested to me about Mark's encounter with a more intelligent life! Paul E O's native flute and keyboards in this song and Bob Grundner's shakers add a total enchanting element to this song. The chorus is absolutely TOP NOTCH on of Marks finest works since Closer To Home. Marks vocals again as a balladeer excel on this song. This song SHOULD have had an added verse then extended at the end and repeated like Closer To Home...This is a must for the NRG's live show...I do hope they add it to the set list! Overall it is a 10. Now one of my favorite Farner Songs!
 
Track 10: Symptoms: Great Sax work on  this one as well...Paul E O is all over this song like stink on @#$%!!! Great guitar work and background vocals!  Great bridge in this one...A song about overcoming the day to day temptations of the symptoms of the flesh of man! Another great song!
 
Track 11: Were Do We Go From Here: Another message from Mark about the Government finding another path to follow. Love the Keyboards in this one. Great solo on this one as well! really shows Mark can play!
 
Overall this album sounds incredible the Mix, The Production and the sound I am a DJ and I play Marks stuff out promnoting it. It sounds phenomenal on my 1200 Watt Yorkville system. This is a great album for the Mark Farner and Grand Funk to own. You will not be dissapointed! Thanks for the new CD Mark and NRG!
 
Rick Keiderling
www.amplifiedproductions.com

 

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10
Live!! N'rG - 2003 - 14 Tracks, by Lissmark (LMN 1051)
1. Footstompin' Music - 4:43
2. Aimless Lady - 3:45
3. Time Machine - 3:26
4. Paranoid - 7:21
5. Heartbreaker - 7:44
6. Into the Sun - 5:41
7. He Sent me You - 3:35
8. Rock 'n Roll Soul - 4:04
9. Mean Mistreater - 6:08
10. Inside Lookin' Out - 8:17
11. Locomotion - 4:00
12. Sins a Good Man's Brother - 5:05
13. Some Kinda Wonderful - 5:15
14. Closer to Home - 8:22

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Keyboards, Vocals, Guitar
Hubert Crawford: Drums, Vocals, Percussion
Lawrence Buckner: Vocals, Bass

Producer: Steve Lisuk and Troy Baldwin
Mastering: Troy Baldwin
Monitor Engineer: John Yonker
Guitar Technician: Allen Day
Photography: Steve Bittinger, Perry Schober, Cindy Page and Fred 'The B Slinger'

Reviews:
Mark Farner does something extraordinary on his 2003 in-concert album, Live! N'rG, named after his NRG band. Recorded on March 8, 2003, at Chicago's DuPage University and March 9, 2003, at the Pabst Theater, Milwaukee, songs from the two shows are combined onto one disc, starting with "Footstompin' Music" from 1971's E Pluribus Funk album and lasting through to the closer, "Closer to Home," from the 1970 album of the same name. And what a powerful set of recordings this is. As producer Steve Lisuk, Farner's partner in Lismark Entertainment, told AMG in August of 2003, this was a special weekend when Grand Funk Railroad's lead singer went out with a three-piece unit performing classics by the influential 1970s hard rock group. This is not your regular five- or six-piece Mark Farner Band live, it is the vocalist with a solid rhythm section reworking Grand Funk classics, and sometimes surpassing the originals in power and translation. It is Grand Funk all grown up, the clarity of "Time Machine" and "Paranoid" proving that the songs were much more than they appeared to be, immersed in the grunge and hype that made them so very popular when they first appeared. Live! N'rG is an important document on many levels. First, it captures the musicianship of bassist Lawrence Buckner and drummer Hubert Crawford wonderfully, their precision giving a classic like "Heartbreaker" definition that was missing in the popular original. Secondly, it shows what a great and underrated songwriter Mark Farner is; the material not only survives, but without the trappings of the "amps on 11" onslaught of Don Brewer and Mel Schacher, everything shines like a beacon. Farner plays keyboards on the opener, "Footstompin' Music," the band's second Top 30 hit from early 1972, and belts it out with sheer joy. Re-recorded over 30 years later it has new authority, the singer switching from keys to guitar, blasting the leads. With the huge fan base up in arms over the lead singer from .38 Special touring with the Schacher/Brewer Grand Funk, it is essential that the man who wrote and sang the songs originally make a statement. Live! N'rG is, in fact, quite a statement. "Aimless Lady" has an entirely new perspective, with Farner's voice out in front of the solid and slick bass and drums. It's Carole King's "The Loco-Motion" that Farner topped the charts with in early 1974 and "Some Kind of Wonderful" -- not the tune by Goffin and King, but the John Ellison & the Soul Brothers Six composition -- which went Top Three for Grand Funk that same year, brought to life again with love and care by this on-fire trio. Missing from the set are George Harrison's "Taxman" and a title from the second Grand Funk LP, "Mr. Limousine Driver," as this live album clocks in at 77 and a half minutes. "Bad Time" and "We're an American Band" weren't even considered for this release, though a companion DVD from another series of concerts is also available with some different tunes. A vital addition to the collection for any serious fan of this artist. ~ Joe Viglione, All Music Guide

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9
The Complete Atlantic Sessions - 2003 - 19 Tracks, by Lissmark (LMR 6345B)
1. Dear Miss Lucy - 3:37
2. Street Fight - 3:56
3. Easy Breezes - 3:45
4. Social Disaster - 3:36
5. He Let Me Love - 3:37
6. You And Me Baby - 2:52
7. Second Chance To Dance - 3:17
8. Lorraine - 3:56
9. Lady Luck - 3:45
10. Ban The Man - 3:10
11. He Sent Me You - 3:17
12. If It Took All Day - 3:14
13. When A Man Loves A Woman - 3:45
14. Faith Keeps It Away - 3:48
15. Crystal Eyes - 3:56
16. Just One Look - 2:47
17. All The Love You Give Me - 4:48
18. Cool Water - 3:15
19. Without You - 2:06

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Vocals and Guitars
Phil Aaberg: Yamaha Piano & Organ, Synthesizers, Clavinet, String Ensemble
Bob Rabbit: Bass
Bob Kulick: Guitar
Al Wotton: Drums
Jimmy Maelan: Percussion
Dick Wagner: Acoustic Guitar on 'Lorraine', Background Vocals
Ricky Farner: Background Vocals
Dennis Bellinger: Bass, Background Vocals
Andy Newman: Drums
Karen Lawrence: Background Vocals on 'Just One Look'

Producers: Jimmy Lovine and Mark Farner

Mixing: Shelly Yakus and Jimmy Iovine
Remixing: Dick Wagner
Remastering: Bill Inglot
Remixing: Andy Abrams and Jay Krugman
Assistant Engineers: Jim Frank, Mark Stebbeds and Robert Hrycyna
String Arrangements: John Topea
Photography: Frank Moscati
Liner Notes: Kristofer Engelhardt

Reviews:
In the new millennium, artists who own record labels are licensing their material once available on major labels and re-releasing it, often with new liner notes and bonus tracks. Grand Funk Railroad's Mark Farner and his partner in Lismark Entertainment, Steve Lisuk, have done just that with Grand Funk's two Warner Bros. releases, What's Funk? and Grand Funk Lives, now adding this combination to the solo music from the group leader, the Mark Farner and No Frills albums that were originally released on Atlantic. Having the 19 songs on compact disc is the first part of the treat. The other surprise is the generous 14-page booklet chock-full of photographs and commentary by Kristofer Engelhardt, the author of -From Grand Funk to Grace, Mark Farner's authorized biography. Having the biographer put the music in perspective is a rare thing, and it makes for a great read while listening to this material all over again. Farner does a great job on Engelhardt's good friend Doris Troy's song, "Just One Look," as he does with the Percy Sledge classic "When a Man Loves a Woman." The other 17 tracks are fine Mark Farner originals from the Dick Wagner-produced, self-titled first solo album No Frills, the disc produced by Jimmy Iovine. The mastering is excellent, with titles like "All the Love You Give Me" and "Cool Water" translating very well to the world of digital. For those who have played the vinyl into the ground, the Dave Schultz and Bill Inglot mastering will surprise, enhancing the original sound. This is a re-release of the limited-edition 2000 release Heirlooms: The Complete Atlantic Sessions, 1977-1978 with expanded liner notes. ~ Joe Viglione, All Music Guide

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30
Classic Masters - 2002 - 15 Tracks, by Capitol / EMI (4880865)
1. We're An American Band - 3:26
2. Time Machine - 3:45
3. Walk Like A Man (You Can Call Me Your Man) - 4:05
4. Some Kind Of Wonderful - 3:22
5. Gimme Shelter - 6:18
6. Shinin' On - 5:56
7. Heartbreaker - 6:34
8. Rock & Roll Soul - 3:29
9. The Loco-Motion - 2:46
10. Footstompin' Music - 3:46
11. Mean Mistreater - 4:55
12. Feelin' Alright - 4:26
13. Take Me - 5:06
14. Bad Time - 2:56
15. I'm Your Captain / Closer To Home - 9:59

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Harmonica, Keyboards, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Vocals
Mel Schacher: Bass, Vocals

Producers: Grand Funk Railroad, Terry Knight, Todd Rundgren, Jimmy Ienner, Cheryl Pawelski, David K. Tedds
Compilation: Cheryl Pawelski and David K. Tedds
Remastering: Robert Vosgien
Art Direction: Peleg Top
Photography: Lynn Goldsmith
Liner Notes: Steve Roeser

Reviews:
Capitol Records launched a midline-priced series called Classic Masters and the 2002 entry for Grand Funk Railroad is meant to appeal to the casual fan. It is intended to replace 1991's Capitol Collectors Series title -- an earlier budget line from the label -- although track-wise it's identical except for one song. Both have 15 cuts, but Classic Masters includes "Take Me" whereas Capitol Collectors Series has "Inside Looking Out." Looking back, it's amazing to realize just how enormously popular these Michigan hard-rockers were in the late '60s and early '70s. For Grand Funk Railroad, popular meant populist blue-collar appeal, and vocalist/guitarist Mark Farner, bass guitarist Mel Schacher, and drummer/vocalist Don Brewer (and, later on, keyboardist Craig Frost) were despised by critics, of course. The merits of anthems like "We're an American Band," "I'm Your Captain/Closer to Home," and the cover "The Loco-Motion" are obvious, but a compilation such as Classic Masters enables deeper appreciation of songs like "Time Machine," "Shinin' On," "Mean Mistreater" (recorded live in 1970 at the Atlanta International Pop Festival), and "Bad Time." Classic Masters is 24-bit digitally remastered, whereas Capitol Collectors Series is credited as being mastered from the original two-track stereo mixes; Classic Masters should be considered the superior collection sound-wise (although it's not as if Grand Funk Railroad's records were as sonically complex as Pink Floyd's), but Capitol Collectors Series has better liner notes. Capitol is to be commended for its overdue CD reissues of Grand Funk Railroad's catalog, but Classic Masters is an excellent sampler die-hard fans like Homer Simpson would approve of. ~ Bret Adams, All Music Guide

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31
Live: The 1971 Tour - 2002 - 11 Tracks, by Capitol (72435-39326-2-6)
1. Intro - 1:39
2. Are You Ready - 3:11
3. Footstompin' Music - 5:24
4. Paranoid - 6:03
5. I'm Your Captain - 5:48
6. Hooked On Love - 2:45
7. Get It Together - 2:46
8. T.N.U.C. - 17:12
9. Inside Looking Out - 15:30
10. Gimme Shelter - 8:44
11. Into The Sun - 9:50

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Harp, Vocals, Organ, Guitar
Don Brewer: Drums, Vocals, Percussion
Mel Schacher: Bass

Reviews:
This Grand Funk Railroad concert recording from Detroit, Chicago, and Shea Stadium on the band's enormously successful 1971 tour captures them in all their mega-stadium excess. Extended beyond the breaking point versions of "T.N.U.C." (nearly 18 minutes), "Inside Looking Out" (over 15 minutes, including a pro-pot intro), ten minutes of "Into the Sun," and nine minutes of what has to be the most plodding version of the Stones' "Gimme Shelter" ever recorded for better or worse portray this trio in all their over-the-top glory. In concert, the least funky band ever to have the word "funk" in their name pounded out tough, workingman rock with as little subtlety as possible, aiming to please the fan sitting in the last row of the stadium. While that may have made for an invigorating concert experience, having to endure this music without the live stage show as distraction is a headache-inducing chore. The sound, while acceptable for 1971 standards, is still brittle and harsh, and Mark Farner's wah-wah-heavy guitar is exactly what Spinal Tap had envisioned with their amps that went to 11. Since this was recorded in the band's earliest period, none of the more pop elements that gave them the hits that softened their sound are in the set. That leaves this as the definitive live document of these years. It's not nearly as listenable or eclectic as 1975's Caught in the Act, which they recorded as a quartet, but does depict the group in all its uncut power, glory, and volume. Brash, noisy, and abrasive, Grand Funk Railroad earned their money by giving the people what they wanted in a show full of raw energy and blistering hard rock. In retrospect, its appeal is limited, but if you were there, you'll appreciate this souvenir. If not, after hearing this warts-and-all recording, you may wonder what all the excitement was about. ~ Hal Horowitz, All Music Guide


The machine that was, and is, Grand Funk Railroad, continues to move along without losing steam. Of course, the machine that was GFR is hobbled by the departure of Mark Farner, again. He is clearly the heart of this band and his absence is sorely felt seeing them live. The remaining elements that make up this legendary band, Mel Schacher and Don Brewer continue on.

However, a markedly more powerful unit was in place early in the 70s with many a remarkable album and tour under their belts. During 1970, GFR toured relentlessly under the watchful eyes of their manager, Terry Knight. During their high point, 1971, the band excelled, not only in new material (Survival) but as an attraction on the road. Their rep for a great show was in full bloom and insane was the fan who missed one of them. Unfortunate for me, I was a sophomore in HS during this period so my loss is still greatly felt by myself.

Grand Funk has released 3 prior Live discs. The powerful, and soon to be re-released and remastered (Aug 27) along with other titles, "Live Album", the double "Caught In The Act", and the more recent "Bosnia". The strength and importance of this band is underscored by the fact that Capitol continues to release material from GFR. In an age where the original label licenses out the music to other labels, this really says a lot.

As I said earlier, Grand Funk was at the height of their popularity in 1971. This disc, featuring live recordings of the band during their trek across America, notably, the Midwest regions where they were revered, showcases the talent and hard work of GFR. There are 11 tracks, all remastered using 24 bit technology and cleaned up using the popular ProTools software. And they rock.

The songs are spread from shows in Detroit, MI (Cobo Hall), Chicago, IL (Syndrome), and New York City, NY (Shea Stadium) from April through July of '71. This trio of power poured out their hearts on the classic crowd pleasers so well known to GFR fans, both then and now. The purity of "I'm Your Captain/Closer To Home" with the drum soaked "TNUC"; the sweeping cover of "Gimme Shelter" that lifted the Stones original to new levels and the fiery "Paranoid". In addition, there was the as yet unreleased but unreal "Footstompin' Music" that, more or less, heralded their ascent into Top 40 stardom, a world apart from their album oriented rock days.

The call for the encore piece, "Into The Sun" really reflects the days of the hippie soaked times when GFR manager/producer (soon to be exiled) Terry Knight gives his Woodstock like speech. His plea to have a just stolen pedal returned so that the band could continue along with the promise that whoever stole it would get it back after the show is priceless and classically recounts those long lost days.

The songs are excellent, as any GFR song performed live would be, particularly in this time frame. The "Live Album" is a much better, much tighter recording, easily representative of the live prowess of the band but this does not detract from the perfection of these live pieces however. They belong in any fan's collection especially after the clean up treatment it received. It may end up being overshadowed by the remastering of the upcoming "Live Album" but that release will not go as far as this one did to recount the time via a informative booklet. My opinion? If you love Grand Funk Railroad as many do, then this is another wonderful addtion to the GFR library; a toast and precursor to the remastering processes awaiting the band's other albums.

DISC
The 24 bit remastering has done wonders for this recording. While it is hard to tell in terms of renewal given the fact that we have not heard this any other way, the clarity provide these old songs and the obvious medium that they were recorded in is nothing short of extraordinary. The channel separations between left and right gave a perfect sense of balance; as if you were standing in front of the band. Mel Schacher's bass guitar is heavy and full;picked up and enhanced while Don Brewer's drums pound with "I'm there" clarity. The guitars and vocals of Mark Farner deliver the package with finality as you marvel over the cleanly delivered live performances. Pro Tools has done much in the enhancement of music both old and new and their usefulness is heard in this release.

PACKAGING
The case is a collection of great looking memoribilia; a ticket stub, poster art and a well designed 12 page booklet. The booklet is a treasure trove of photos, band art, a written remembrance by Steve Roeser with liner notes by producer David K Tedds, and disc information. Attractively packaged, there is no stone unturned in this offering.

THE FINAL SAY
If Grand Funk Railroad meant anything to you, particularly during its album oriented days, this is a must pick up for you. It rocks as well as any current band would, maybe better. Whether it's known or not, every rock band after GFR cut their live teeth on this band.

Reviewed by Matt Rowe on July 29, 2002

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8
Red, White and Blue Forever - 2002 - 3 Tracks, by Lissmark (LMS 1001)
1. Red, White and Blue - 3:59
2. Airborne Ranger - 4:01
3. Closer to Home (acoustic version) - 6:07

Other Info:
Guest Musicians/Artists:
Greg Morrow: Drums
Larry Paxton: Bass
David Koz: Saxophone
Etta Britt: Background Vocals
Vickie Carrico: Background Vocals
Ricky Farner: Vocals, Guitar
David Lyndon Huff: Drums
Lee Roy Parnell: Rhythm Guitar, Slide Guitar
Phil Keaggy: Guitar
Tim Heintz: Keyboards

Producer: Mark Farner


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34
The Pack Anthology - 2002 - 22 Tracks, by Lissmark
1. The Tears Come Rolling - 2:40
2. How Much More - 2:34
3. I've Been Told - 2:42
4. Better Man Than I - 2:54
5. Got Love - 3:13
6. Lady Jane - 2:48
7. Lovin' Kind - 3:00
8. A Change on the Way - 3:41  
9. What's On Your Mind - 1:49
10. I (Who Have Nothing) - <3:22/font>  
11. Numbers - 2:28
12. This Precious Time - 2:50
13. Love,Love,Love,Love - 2:54
14. One Monkey Won't Stop No Show - 2:41
15. The Train - 2:10
16. Harlem Shuffle - 3:04
17. Down in The Valley - 2:22
18. I've Got News For You - 2:51
19. Wide Trackin' - 2:45
20. Does It Matter To You Girl - 2:01
21. Next to Your Fire - 2:44
22. Sleep Talkin' - 3:02

Reviews:
In 1972, ABKCO Records released Funk Off: Mark, Don & Terry 1966-67, which had the same packaging as Grand Funk's greatest hits collection, Mark, Don & Mel. Twenty-one selections were on that Terry Knight & the Pack double LP, which got pulled from the shelves and is now a collectors item. Exactly 30 years later, Mark Farner's own Lismark Communications has issued 22 titles from the Pack on an album entitled The Pack Anthology: The Singles 1965-1968, and it is the definitive collection from the Pack featuring a dozen of the tracks found on the 1972 ABKCO release, along with other nuggets from the Michigan rock scene. With a 12-page booklet written by Farner biographer Kris Engelhardt, author of -From Grand Funk to Grace, the emphasis is on the singles released by the group, and Engelhardt does a good job of chronicling the bands regional hits and misses. Ten of the 12 tracks from the debut album, Terry Knight & the Pack, are included here, as well as four of the 12 from the follow-up LP, Reflections, and two from Monumental Funk, the interesting post-Pack release of the Jerry Tuttle-produced Nashville sessions. For those who gave Terry Knight a pass because of the historic significance of the vinyl releases, the CD makes it painfully clear that they guy can't sing, and this his personality, at least on record, is lacking. Outside of the great '60s sound of the musicians, the most significant takes are the opener, "Tears Come Rolling," featuring a young Bobby Caldwell on vocals and tracks 16-21, which feature Mark Farner on vocals, his wonderful version of Bob & Earl's "Harlem Shuffle," as well as an early Dick Wagner composition, "Wide Trackin'," recorded when the group was known as the Fabulous Pack. The story is here in the music and accompanying booklet, a true artifact which has surfaced again, this time in its proper setting. Lismark did a nice job re-creating the Lucky Eleven logo and including a wonderful array of photos. ~ Joe Viglione, All Music Guide

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32
Trunk of Funk - 2002 - 45 Tracks, by Capitol (72435-41422-2-2)
1. Are You Ready - 3:28
2. Anybody's Answer - 5:17
3. Time Machine - 3:45
4. High On A Horse - 2:56
5. T.N.U.C. - 8:42
6. Into The Sun - 6:29
7. Heartbreaker - 6:35
8. Call Yourself A Man - 3:05
9. Can't Be Too Long - 6:34
10. Ups And Downs - 5:10
11. High On A Horse (Original Version) - 4:25
12. Heartbreaker (Original Version) - 6:52
13. Got This Thing On The Move - 4:21
14. Please Don't Worry -  
15. High Falootin' Woman - 3:02
16. Mr. Limousine Driver - 4:27
17. In Need - 7:54
18. Winter And My Soul - 6:39
19. Paranoid - 7:52
20. Inside Looking Out - 9:41
21. Nothing Is The Same (Demo) - 5:39
22. Mr. Limousine Driver (Extended Version) - 5:28
23. Sin's A Good Man's Brother - 4:51
24. Aimless Lady - 3:29
25. Nothing Is The Same - 5:14
26. Mean Mistreater - 4:27
27. Get It Together - 5:10
28. I Don't Have To Sing The Blues - 4:37
29. Hooked On Love - 7:13
30. I'm Your Captain - 10:08
31. Mean Mistreater (Alternate Mix) - 4:33
32. In Need (Live) - 11:30
33. Heartbreaker (Live) - 7:17
34. Mean Mistreater (Live) - 5:22
35. Introduction (Live) - 2:26
36. Are You Ready (Live) - 3:38
37. Paranoid (Live) - 7:19
38. In Need (Live) - 10:57
39. Heartbreaker (Live) - 7:10
40. Words Of Wisdom (Live) - 0:52
41. Mean Mistreater (Live) - 4:53
42. Mark Says Alright (Live) - 5:13
43. T.N.U.C. (Live) - 10:54
44. Inside Looking Out (Live) - 13:42
45. Into The Sun (Live) - 11:26

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Vocals, Guitar, Harmonica, Piano
Don Brewer: Drums, Vocals
Mel Schacher: Bass

Producers: Terry Knight, Shannon Ward, Bryan Kelley
Conductor, Orchestral Arrangements: Thomas Baker
Creative Director: Michelle Azzopardi
Reissue Producer, Compilation: David K. Tedds
A&R: Kevin Flaherty
Engineer: Kenneth Hamann
Mixing: Jimmy Hoyson
Mastering: Evren Goknar
Equipment Rental: Wally Heider
Cover Design: Mark Amerling
Art Direction, Design: Neil Kellerhouse
Editorial Supervision: Brendan Gormley
Cover Photos: Barry Edmunds, Mark Amerling, Joe Sia
Memorabilia: Mark 'Footstompin' Kaulfus, David K. Tedds
Liner Notes: Terry Knight, Steve Roeser


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7
Heirlooms - 2000 - 19 Tracks, by Lissmark (LMR 6345)
1. Dear Miss Lucy - 3:37
2. Street Fight - 3:56
3. Easy Breezes - 3:45
4. Social Disaster - 3:36
5. He Let Me Love - 3:37
6. You And Me Baby - 2:52
7. Second Chance To Dance - 3:17
8. Lorraine - 3:56
9. Lady Luck - 3:45
10. Ban The Man - 3:10
11. He Sent Me You - 3:17
12. If It Took All Day - 3:14
13. When A Man Loves A Woman - 3:45
14. Faith Keeps It Away - 3:48
15. Crystal Eyes - 3:56
16. Just One Look - 2:47
17. All The Love You Give Me - 4:48
18. Cool Water - 3:15
19. Without You - 2:06

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Vocals and Guitars
Phil Aaberg: Yamaha Piano & Organ, Synthesizers, Clavinet, String Ensemble
Bob Rabbit: Bass
Bob Kulick: Guitar
Al Wotton: Drums
Jimmy Maelan: Percussion
Dick Wagner: Acoustic Guitar on "Lorraine, Background Vocals
Ricky Farner: Background Vocals
Dennis Bellinger: Bass, Background Vocals
Andy Newman: Drums
Karen Lawrence: Background Vocals on 'Just One Look'

Producers: Jimmy Lovine and Mark Farner

CD reissue of the complete Atlantic Record's sessions from 1977 and 1978 which were the recordings featured on Mark's first 2 solo albums. Dave Schultz and Bill Inglot did the digitally remastering with manufacturing by Rhino Records. The first 1000 copies have been individually numbered and have special packaging and labelling.

Reviews:
Heirlooms: The Complete Atlantic Sessions, 1977-1978 is single CD with all the music from Mark Farner's first two albums without Grand Funk Railroad, both originally released on Atlantic. Credited to the Mark Farner Band on the inside spine and Mark Farner on the outside, there are five photographs of the musician with his wife, Lesia Farner, on the tray card and a six-page booklet that accompanies the package with liner notes by the artist explaining how it all came to be. There are also photos of producer Dick Wagner, bassist Bob Babbitt, and an unnamed engineer from the self-titled first Atlantic disc giving it that family photo album feel. It's interesting hearing the production work of Wagner recorded at Farner's studio The Swamp and completed at Nimbus Nine in Toronto, Canada, back to back with No Frills producer Jimmy Iovine's work from The Record Plant in New York. Both world-class producers do as the second album title states: they record Mark Farner solo with "no frills," and the sound is remarkably consistent. The embellishments that Todd Rundgren and Jimmy Ienner added to Grand Funk are not employed, giving a very clear picture of Farner's voice, lyrics, and performance. The story that A&R man Michael Klefner was fired six weeks after signing this act is so typical of the industry -- and it is interesting how years later so many artists are re-releasing important material they've created on their own imprints. Lissmark Communications is Farner's own label founded by him and the former Freedom Reader editor, Steve Lisuk. Of note is that younger brother Rick Farner shows up on backing vocals along with Dennis Bellinger, both recorded in Toronto, with Bellinger becoming the bassist for the follow-up album, No Frills. He would replace Mel Schacher for the Grand Funk Lives and What's Funk? albums as well as the touring for that first reunion of GFR. The material here is licensed from Atlantic, manufactured by Rhino, and the initial press run is numbered. The company may let this title go out of print and re-release the albums on their own, which would make Heirlooms just that: a big time collectors item. ~ Joe Viglione, All Music Guide

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28
Thirty Years of Funk - 1999 - 45 Tracks, by Capitol (72434-99523-2-4)
1. Getting Into the Sun - 4:45
2. Can't be Too Long - 6:00
3. Got This Thing on the Move - 3:17
4. Time Machine - 3:44
5. High On a Horse - 2:55
6. Mr. Limosine Driver - 4:27
7. Sins a Good Man's Brother - 4:49
8. Aimless Lady - 3:29
9. Mean Mistreater - 4:27
10. I'm Your Captain - 9:58
11. Are You Ready - 3:44
12. Paranoid - 6:40
13. Inside Looking Out - 16:25
14. Feelin' Alright - 4:26
15. Gimme Shelter - 6:20
16. I Can Feel Him In The Mornin - 4:26
17. I Can't Get Along With Society - 4:42
18. Upsetter - 4:29
19. Lonliness - 8:38
20. Trying To Get Away - 4:11
21. Walk Like A Man - 4:05
22. Creepin' - 7:02
23. We're An American Band - 3:27
24. Hooray - 4:06
25. The End - 4:11
26. To Get Back In - 3:56
27. Destitute and Losin' - 7:02
28. Shinin' On - 5:57
29. Locomotion - 2:47
30. Some Kind of Wonderful - 3:22
31. Bad Time - 2:55
32. Footstompin' Music - 4:08
33. Rock `n Roll Soul - 4:00
34. Heartbreaker - 7:26
35. Love Is Dyin' - 4:14
36. Take Me - 5:10
37. Sally - 3:16
38. Can You Do It - 3:17
39. Pass It Around - 5:00
40. Crossfire - 4:21
41. Queen Bee - 3:14
42. We Gotta Get Out of This Place - 5:14
43. Pay Attention To Me - 3:21
44. All I Do - 3:30
45. In The Long Run - 4:12

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Keyboards, Vocals, Guitar, Harmonica, Percussion
Don Brewer: Drums, Vocals, Photography, Percussion
Mel Schacher: Guitar (Bass)
Dennis Bellinger: Guitar (Bass), Vocals
Craig Frost: Keyboards, Vocals
Brent A. Woody: Keyboards
Jimmy Hall: Harmonica
Donna Hall: Vocals (Background)

Supervising Producer: Cheryl Pawelski
Producers: Grand Funk Railroad, Terry Knight, Lisa Reddick, John Rhys & David K. Tedds
Project Manager: Wayne Greene
Creative Director: Sam Gay
Mastering: Evren Goknar
Compilation: David K. Tedds
Engineering: Ron Nevison and Jimmy Romeo
Mixing: John Hendrickson, David K. Tedds and Ron Nevison
Photography: Ken Settle, Sam Emerson, Neal Preston, Norman Seeff, Lynn Goldsmith & Jim Shea
Liner Notes: Jim Bessman

Reviews:
Thirty Years of Funk is a three-CD boxed set anthology of the music of one of America's premier heavy rock bands, Grand Funk Railroad. This set covers the music of the band from 1969, when the band first burst onto the music scene and ushered in a post-British Invasion alternative to the progressive movement, until they broke up in 1976 to subsequently reform in the mid-'90s.

Although Grand Funk Railroad was officially formed in 1969, some band members played together as Terry Knight & the Pack in the mid-'60s and this set opens with three songs from the Pack from 1968. The set concentrates on being a complete anthology of Grand Funk material with only two to three songs from each one of the band's 16 studio albums. All of the band's albums are represented in this collection except for one album that was released on the Warner Bros. label in 1983. The set also contains a number of previously unreleased alternate recordings, outtakes, and live material to add appeal to fans. In 1997, Grand Funk performed a concert for Bosnia and in 1998 got together in the studio and for a tour and recorded a number of new tracks, three of which are contained on this set. Although a number of the band's early songs and some fans' best-of tracks are not contained on this set, thus making it flawed according to fans, it is the best retrospective package of Grand Funk Railroad's music available to date on the market. The set's booklet contains detailed information on the history of the band, a discography, album jacket photos, and detailed song information. ~ Keith Pettipas, All Music Guide

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27
Bosnia - 1997 - 20 Tracks, by Capitol (72438-21937-2-2)
1. 2001: A Space Odyssey - 1:25
2. Are You Ready - 3:26
3. Rock 'n Roll Soul - 3:50
4. Footstompin' Music - 4:19
5. Time Machine - 3:17
6. Medley - 7:17
7. Heartbreaker - 7:38
8. Aimless Lady - 3:53
9. T.N.U.C. - 7:25
10. Inside Looking Out - 10:22
11. Shinin' On - 3:37
12. The Loco-motion - 3:41
13. We're An American Band - 3:58
14. Overture - 2:59
15. Mean Mistreater - 4:26
16. Some Kind Of Wonderful - 2:58
17. To Get Back In - 4:02
18. Bad Time - 2:57
19. I'm Your Captain/Closer To Home - 9:04
20. Lonliness - 8:59

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Lead Vocals and Guitar
Don Brewer: Drums and Vocals
Mel Schacher: Bass
Howard Eddy: Keyboards and Background Vocals
Peter Frampton: Special Guest on Guitar
Alto Reed and the Motor City Horns: Special Guest on Saxaphone and on Horns
Paul Schaffer: Special Guest Conductor for members of the Detroit Symphony with first chairs filled by members of the Sarajevo Symphony and other international musicians.

Recorded live with a symphony orchestra, including members of the Detroit and Sarajevo Symphony Orchestras, at The Palace, Auburn Hills, Michigan on 20 April 1997.

Producer: Ron Nevison
Remote Recording: Dave and Dusty Hewitt
Orchestral Arrangements: Jimmy Haskell
Album Photos: Kim Foster and Ken Settle

Reviews:
Noted Grand Funk Railroad fan, Homer Simpson, once described what made this band so great: "the wild, shirtless lyrics of Mark Farner; the bone-crushing bass of Mel Schacher; the competent drum work of Don Brewer." I've been a GFR fan from the first time I heard the band's excellent E Pluribus Funk album back in '71. Although I was skeptical when I heard that the original trio of Mark, Don & Mel were going to tour after almost 20 years, I quickly became psyched when I heard they would be performing with an orchestra.

Few American bands back then could compete with Grand Funk when it came to sheer power on stage. To these ears, their 1974 live album, Caught in the Act remains one of the best live albums ever recorded. Needless to say, they had some pretty high standards to live up to. After the orchestral intro from Also Sprach Zarathustra, they launch into a slightly rusty version of "Are You Ready." Brewer's vocals aren't quite as strong, and Farner's guitar is missing the ballsy sound heard on the studio version.

But things pick up quickly. "Rock and Roll Soul" is next, and the band starts to loosen up. By the time they get to "Footstompin' Music," the band is firmly in the groove and kicking some serious ass. Peter Frampton joins the band onstage for the first of a handful of tunes, the bluesy "Time Machine." One of the best tracks on Bosnia is the medley of "Paranoid," "Sin's a Good Man's Brother" and "Mr. Limousine Driver." By this time, I'm wondering how this disc can possibly get any better.

"Aimless Lady" features another special guest-sax player Alto Reed (from Bob Seger's band). Brewer gets to show his abilities on the early classic, "T.N.U.C.," before moving onto a great rendition of "Inside Looking Out," featuring some outstanding guitar work from Farner. After a short, but still great "Shinin' On," they go into their cover of "The Loco-Motion" (featuring Frampton & Reed). This song has always been a set killer for any true GFR fan, but they do a decent job here.

Disc Two starts with a short orchestral medley of a few of the band's signature songs, then segues into "Mean Mistreater." One of the biggest surprises on Bosnia is "To Get Back In." Originally on the Shinin' On album, this was one of those songs that was never really bad, but nothing spectacular either. Here it's presented in a new light with a horn section (led by Reed), and Farner soloing effortlessly over the end section. This one gets my vote for most improved song.

When it comes to true rock classics, few can deny that "I'm Your Captain/Closer to Home" fits the bill. It's always the highlight of any concert that it's performed in. Playing the song live with an orchestra was "a dream come true" for Farner, and it shows. Even the most jaded fan will be moved when they hear this new version. Out of all the songs included on Bosnia, the one I anticipated the most is "Loneliness." The studio version featured an orchestral arrangement, and now we finally have a live version to compare it to. Did it live up to my expectations? You bet.

Bosnia is required listening for any Grand Funk fan. There are only bad things--most of the time you can't hear Mel's bass, and the second disc is WAY too short. Other than that, these 2 CDs have been getting played repeatedly, and show no sign of letting up. If you're not a fan, go to your local music store, buy this CD and find out what you've been missing.

© 1998 Steve Marshall

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39
Heavy Hitters - 1992 - 12 Tracks, by EMI/Capitol
1. Closer To Home - 5:35
2. Footstompin' Music - 3:48
3. Mean Mistreater - 4:27
4. Are You Ready? - 3:30
5. Feelin' Alright - 4:26
6. Heartbreaker - 6:36
7. Gimme Shelter - 3:30
8. Time Machine - 3:46
9. Upsetter - 4:28
10. Mr. Limousine Driver - 4:28
11. Get It Together - 5:05
12. Got This Thing On The Move - 4:37


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6
Closer to Home - 1992 - 12 Tracks, by Frontline (FL 92962)
1. Some Kind Of Wonderful - 4:46
2. Come To Jesus - 3:58
3. Without You - 4:50
4. Judgement Day Blues - 4:46
5. Not Yet - 4:43
6. Wake Up - 4:23
7. Isn't It Amazing - 4:35  
8. If It Wasn't For Grace - 3:53
9. Airborne Ranger - 3:57
10. Love From Above - 4:10
11. Come To Me - 3:58  
12. Give Me The Works - 3:25

Other Info:
Guest Musicians/Artists:
Mike Maple: Drums, Background Vocals
Lawrence Buckner: Bass, Lead Vocals, Background Vocals
Tim Heintz: Keyboards
Glen Pearce: Lead Guitar
Bill Baumgart: Background Vocals
Jean McClain: Background Vocals
John Patitucci: Bass
Kirt Shearer: Bass
Bob Carlisle: Background Vocals
David Huff: Drums
Michael Blair: Keyboards, Background Vocals
Gordon Van Ekstrom: Guitar
Phil Keaggy: Lead Guitar
Brandon Fields: Sax
Arnie Vilches: Lead Guitar

Producers: Mark Farner, Bill Baumgart


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5
Some Kind of Wonderful - 1991 - 10 Tracks, by Frontline (FL 9217)
1. Some Kind Of Wonderful - 4:49
2. Love From Above - 4:13  
3. Without You - 4:53
4. Not Yet - 4:46
5. Attitude Of Gratitude - 3:47
6. All The Way - 4:22
7. With Me Anwhere - 4:17
8. Conflict - 3:57  
9. The Vision - 4:22  
10. Well Done - 4:24

Other Info:
Guest Musicians/Artists:
Mike Maple: Drums, Background Vocals
Lawrence Buckner: Bass, Background Vocals, Lead Vocals on 'Some Kind Of Wonderful'
Glen Pearce: Lead Guitar
Arnaldo Vilches: Lead Guitar
Bill Baumgart: Background Vocals
Jean McClain: Background Vocals
Brandon Fields: Sax, Flute

Producer: Bill Baumgart


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38
Capitol Collectors Series - 1991 - 15 Tracks, by Capitol (CDP 7 90608 2)
1. Time Machine - 3:44
2. Heartbreaker - 6:33
3. Inside Looking Out - 9:31
4. Closer To Home / I'm Your Captain - 10:08
5. Mean Mistreater - 5:01
6. Feelin' Alright - 4:24
7. Gimme Shelter - 6:16
8. Footstompin' Music - 3:45
9. Rock & Roll Soul - 3:25
10. We're An American Ban - 3:25
11. Walk Like A Man (You Can Call Me Your Man) - 4:04
12. The Loco-Motion - 2:57
13. Shinin' On - 5:54
14. Some Kind Of Wonderful - 3:16
15. Bad Time - 2:53

Reviews:
Grand Funk Railroad was, at best, a singles band, capable of turning a couple of crunching rockers and hooky singles out with each album. Though it may be missing a fan favorite or two — and that could mean something concise and catchy or meandering jams like "T.N.U.C." — this does have the overwhelming majority of their best songs, including not just hits like "We're an American Band" and "Some Kind of Wonderful," but also album tracks. Some longtime fans, like Homer Simpson, may find favorites missing, but this remains a nearly ideal summary. ~ by Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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4
Wake Up - 1989 - 11 Tracks, by Frontline (FL 09060)
1. Wake Up - 4:32  
2. Into The Light - 3:59
3. New Age - 3:22
4. Come To Me - 3:58
5. In Your Sight - 5:23
6. Upright Man - 3:30
7. Rocco - 3:48
8. If It Wasn't For Grace - 3:53
9. Love Power - 4:00  
10. Role Model - 5:34
11. Like I Was Before - 3:52

Other Info:
Guest Musicians/Artists:
Mike Maple: Background Vocals, Drums, Percussion
Lawrence Buckner: Background Vocals, Bass
Michael Blair: Background Vocals, Keyboards
Arnie Vilches: Rhythm Guitar, Lead Guitar
Gordon Van Ekstrom: Rhythm Guitar, Lead Guitar

Producer: Mark Farner


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3
Just Another Injustice - 1988 - 10 Tracks, by Frontline ()
1. Airborne Ranger - 3:57  
2. Judgement Day Blues - 4:46  
3. Isn't It Amazing - 4:35
4. Come To Jesus - 3:58
5. Give Me The Works - 3:25
6. An Emotional Look At Love - 3:16
7. Workin' For The Winner - 3:40
8. Just Another Injustice - 3:55
9. The Writing On The Wall - 4:30
10. Only You - 3:43

Other Info:
Guest Musicians/Artists:
Tim Heintz: Keyboards
David Huff: Drums
David Koz: Sax
Phil Keaggy: Lead Guitar on 'Airborne Ranger', Accoustic Guitar on 'Give Me The Works'
Michael Hodge: Additional Guitar

Producers: Mark Farner, Tim Heintz, Bill Baumgart


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37
Great! - 1987 - 16 Tracks, by Pair/Capitol (CDL-9576)
1. Footstompin' Music -
2. Are You Ready -
3. Mean Mistreater -
4. High On A Horse -
5. Feelin' Alright -
6. Gimme Shelter -
7. High Falootin' Woman -
8. Mr. Limousine Driver -
9. Get It Together -
10. Time Machine -
11. Got This Thing On The Move -
12. Call Yourself A Man -
13. Upsetter -
14. Please Don't Worry -
15. Save The Land -
16. I Want Freedom -


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26
What's Funk? - 1983 - 10 Tracks, by Full Moon / Warner (23750-1)
1. Rock 'n Roll American Style - 4:29  
2. Nowhere To Run - 2:39
3. Innocent - 3:05
4. Still Waitin' - 4:05
5. Borderline - 2:56
6. El Salvador - 4:11
7. It's A Man's World - 4:54
8. I'm So True - 4:10
9. Don't Lie To Me - 4:18
10. Life In Outer Space - 4:20

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Vocals, Guitars, Keyboards
Don Brewer: Vocals, Drums, Percussion
Dennis Bellinger: Backing Vocals, Bass

Producers: Cliff Davies (Tracks 2,3,5,7), Gary Lyons

Reviews:
After making a comeback in 1981, the revamped 1980s version of Grand Funk Railroad took one last stab at the '80s rock market with What's Funk? This time, the band enlisted Gary Lyons (producer for Foreigner and the Outlaws) to create an updated version of the kind of slickly produced album that made the group into a pop hitmaker during the mid-'70s. The end result is an improvement over 1981's underproduced Grand Funk Lives, but it still suffers from some uneven moments. Lyons adds plenty of early-'80s frills to the group sound, the most notable examples being the synthesizers and drum machines that dress up tunes like "Innocent" and "I'm So True." This approach doesn't always work (the Gary Numan-like programmed synthesizers that underpin "Borderline" clutter up what could have been an effective slice of guitar-driven hard rock), but the group turns in the kind of songs and energetic performances that help make What's Funk? an engaging album. Good examples include "Still Waitin'," a straight-ahead rocker that seamlessly blends heavy guitar riffs with a catchy chorus, and "Borderline," a soulful power ballad that balances the group's instrumental power with plenty of smooth harmonies. Another highlight is the group's cover of the James Brown classic "It's a Man's World," which cleverly rearranges the tune to fit the band's power trio format. In the end, What's Funk? lacks the kind of exceptional songs and breakout hits that would have made the album cross over to the mainstream, but it remains a solid batch of tunes that will please the group's fans. ~ Donald A. Guarisco, All Music Guide

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25
Grand Funk Lives - 1981 - 10 Tracks, by Full Moon / Warner (FMH 3265)
1. Good Times - 2:05
2. Queen Bee - 3:13
3. Testify - 2:58
4. Can't Be With You Tonite - 3:29
5. No Reason Why - 4:47
6. We Gotta Get Out Of This Place - 3:55
7. Y.O.U. - 2:53  
8. Stuck In The Middle - 3:09
9. Greed Of Man - 5:00
10. Wait For Me - 4:52  

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Piano, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Vocals
Dennis Bellinger: Bass, Vocals
Lance Duncan Ong: Synthesiser, Organ

Producers: Andrew Cavaliere, Bob Destocki, Thom Panunzio

Reviews:
Rising like a Phoenix, which was the title of one of their previous albums, perhaps Mark Farner is sending a subliminal message with opening track "Good Times" that his "Bad Time" is over? The song "Testify," track three, sums up this very good album from Mark Farner, Don Brewer, and bassist Dennis Bellinger replacing the MIA Mel Schacher. It's a hooky rock tune with Farner's religious overtones. All these tracks are strong, from "Can't Be With You Tonight" to the glorious ending of "Wait for Me." The no-nonsense production of manager Andrew Cavaliere -- shades of Terry Knight! --- and Bob Destocki, lets Farner and Brewer shine. This album is like a subdued version of the Grand Funk classic Survival. In fact, both Survival and Grand Funk Lives are underrated, not just among Grand Funk fans. Where the first Mark Farner solo album, produced by Dick Wagner, had more of a bluesy feel in 1977, and 1978's Flint by Brewer and company sounded like a stab in the dark, this collection rocks. "Queen Bee" has riffs taken from Black Sabbath and Uriah Heep, specifically the ending of the song; "Black Sabbath meets Heep's "Easy Livin'," with Farner's pop influences glossing it up. "We Gotta Get out of This Place" has more in common with a hard-rocking Young Rascals than the Animals or David Johansen. "Y.O.U." is almost there, halfway to a hit, missing the strength of producers Jimmy Ienner, Todd Rundgren, heck, even Frank Zappa might've lifted this track into the Top 40. The restrained production on the rest of the album is a plus except for "Y.O.U.," which needed just a bit more. "Stuck in the Middle" is fun Mark Farner, and is perhaps the best track on this excellent outing. Heavy keyboards, a great hook, and thick chorus -- a nice sequel to Funk's 1975 hit "Bad Time." "Greed of Man" goes back to the harder preaching of original GFR. All tunes except the cover of "We Gotta Get out of This Place" were written by Farner, who closes out the album with the introspective "Wait for Me." In a world mutated by Guns N' Roses, Nirvana, and Aerosmith gone pop, Grand Funk Railroad kept the flame of hard rock lit with this solid disc. It's too bad it didn't reach a larger audience. ~ Joe Viglione, All Music Guide

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2
No Frills - 1978 - 9 Tracks, by Atlantic (SD 19169)
1. He Sent Me You - 3:17
2. If It Took All Day - 3:14  
3. When A Man Loves A Woman - 3:44  
4. Faith Keeps It Away - 4:47
5. Crystal Eyes - 3:55
6. Just One Look - 2:47
7. All The Love You Give Me - 4:48
8. Cool Water - 3:14  
9. Without You - 2:06

Other Info:
Guest Musicians/Artists:
Dennis Bellinger: Bass, Background Vocals
Andy Newman: Drums
Karen Lawrence: Background Vocals on "Just One Look"

Producer: Jimmy Lovine


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1
Mark Farner - 1977 - 10 Tracks, by Atlantic (SD 1832)
1. Dear Miss Lucy - 3:37
2. Street Fight - 3:55
3. Easy Breezes - 3:45
4. Social Disaster - 3:35  
5. He Let Me Love - 3:34
6. You And Me Baby - 2:51  
7. Second Chance To Dance - 3:15
8. Lorraine - 3:55
9. Lady Luck - 3:45  
10. Ban The Man - 3:05

Other Info:
Guest Musicians/Artists:
Phil Aaberg: Yamaha Piano & Organ, Synthesizers, Clavinet, String Ensebmle
Bob Rabbit: Bass
Bob Kulick: Guitar
Al Wotton: Drums
Jimmy Maelan: Percussion
Dick Wagner: Acoustic Guitar on 'Lorraine', Background Vocals
Ricky Farner: Background Vocals
Dennis Bellinger: Background Vocals

Reviews:
Mark Farner's unmistakable voice and guitar sound are the identifying marks Grand Funk Railroad imprinted on the rock consciousness of the world. His self-titled solo album from 1977 replaces Farner's pop sensibilities with modern blues. Where bands like Foghat and the Groundhogs had a more earthy sound, producer Dick Wagner gives this effort a nice glossy mix of traditional rock and contemporary '70s polish. "Lorraine" dances with Phil Aaberg's Yamaha piano and producer Wagner's acoustic guitar. Wagner performed with Farner in a 1966 band, the Bossmen, before Wagner created the Frost and went on to fame with Lou Reed and Alice Cooper. This recording was released in the middle of Alice Cooper's 1975-1978 hit streak with Wagner, adult contemporary pop which the singer of the Top Five "Bad Time" and number one "Loco-Motion" should have been able to capitalize on. Even harder-edged tunes like "Lucky Lady" could have brightened up FM radio at the time. The guitars on "Ban the Man" do not resonate with the Grand Funk sound; it is Farner all grown up. The album is adult Contemporary modern blues, the guitars rocking hard, but not quite metal. "You and Me Baby" is perhaps the poppiest song on the album, with a catchy riff and uplifting vocal. It is the only song that clocks in under three minutes at 2:51, the other nine tracks all in the three-plus-minute range. Where the 1978 album by ex-Grand Funk members Don Brewer, Mel Schacher, and Craig Frost, Flint on Columbia, suffered from overproduction, Wagner puts Farner in a perfect sound setting for his artistry and the time. Maybe radio would have responded better to a cover song on the record, Farner's version of Doris Troy's "Just One Look" is what was needed here, and its absence is obvious. But tracks like "Dear Miss Lucy" and the very hard-edged latter-day Beach Boys take on "Street Fight" make for a respectable musical statement by a rock legend. Had Grand Funk Railroad released "Easy Breezes," they could have perhaps found new life in a third incarnation. It's inventive and is the high point of a serious solo outing by a man confident in his songwriting abilities. ~ Joe Viglione, All Music Guide

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23
Born To Die - 1976 - 10 Tracks, by Capitol (511482)
1. Born To Die - 5:29
2. Dues - 5:27
3. Sally - 3:12
4. I Fell For Your Love - 4:06
5. Talk To The People - 5:27
6. Take Me - 5:00
7. Genevieve - 6:12  
8. Love Is Dyin' - 4:07
9. Politician - 3:51  
10. Good Things - 4:14

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Percussion, Vocals
Craig Frost: Keyboards, Vocals
Donna Hall: Background Vocals
Jimmie Hall: Saxophone, Harmonica
Mel Schacher: Bass

Producer: Jimmy Ienner

Reviews:
The title says it all: Although not steeped in heavy metal riffs or gothic sound effects, this 1976 effort from Grand Funk Railroad creates a mood gloomy enough to rival the darkest moments of Black Sabbath. By this point in their career, the band was feeling run into the ground and this is reflected in the mood of the lyrics: the title track is mournful rumination on the inevitability of death and "I Feel for Your Love" explores the depression created by the end of a relationship. The result is an album that feels like an anomaly in the Grand Funk Railroad catalog: the album's dark mood sits at odds with the group's normally energetic style and, thus, robs it of a lot of its punch. Even though the production is solid and the group's instrumental performance is tight, neither of these elements make it easy to listen to an album of oppressively dreary songs. However, a few bright spots shine through: "Sally" is a country-tinged mid-tempo rocker that highlights Mark Farner's harmonica playing and "Take Me" is a driving, lusty rocker that briefly adds a shot of much-needed energy to the proceedings. Of the gloomier tracks, "Love Is Dyin'" stands out because it applies a strong, guitar-heavy rock melody to its sad sentiments to create a song that is both driving and emotionally affecting. Ultimately, Born to Die is such a grim affair that it may turn off some of the group's fans but it remains an interesting curio for the Grand Funk Railroad completist. ~ Donald A. Guarisco, All Music Guide

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24
Good Singin', Good Playin' - 1976 - 12 Tracks, by MCA (MCA 2216)
1. Just Couldn't Wait - 3:28
2. Can You Do It - 3:17
3. Pass It Around - 4:59
4. Don't Let 'Em Take Your Gun - 3:40  
5. Miss My Baby - 7:20
6. Big Buns - 0:30
7. Out To Get You - 4:44
8. Cross Fire - 4:19
9. 1976 - 4:20
10. Release Your Love - 3:52
11. Goin' For The Pastor - 5:24  
12. Rubberneck - 5:15

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Piano, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Percussion, Vocals
Craig Frost: Keyboards, Vocals
Mel Schacher: Bass, Vocals
Frank Zappa: Guitar

Producer: Frank Zappa

Reviews:
After the surprisingly dark and subdued Born to Die, Grand Funk Railroad's original lineup rallied to record one more album in 1976. Also onboard was an unlikely choice of producer, avant-garde rock king Frank Zappa. As odd as this marriage may seem, the end result is one of the best albums in the Grand Funk Railroad canon. Zappa's production forsakes the high-gloss style that dominated the rest of their mid-'70s output, instead opting for a live-in-the-studio approach with minimal overdubs. This style works well, allowing the group to funnel the solid songcraft they had developed during their hitmaking years into a loose, energetic soundscape that harkens back to the finest moments of their early power-trio output. Indeed, songs like "Can You Do It" and "Out to Get You" (featuring a guest guitar solo from Zappa) crackle with the kind of hard rock energy that had been lost on All The Girls in the World Beware and Born to Die. However, the songs do not get buried under the power-trio theatrics: "Just Couldn't Wait" is a dynamic fusion of pop hooks and rock firepower that highlights the group's oft-underrated harmonies and "Release Your Love" injects catchy singalong choruses to a country-inflected slice of rock. Another highlight is "Miss My Baby," an anguished, epic power ballad that shows off the group's sound at its most subtle and atmospheric. To sum up, Good Singin' Good Playin' is an album that will please the group's fans and may even win over other classic rock enthusiasts with its combination of well-crafted songs and gutsy, no-frills production. ~ Donald A. Guarisco, All Music Guide

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36
Grand Funk Hits - 1976 - 10 Tracks, by Capitol (LP - ST-11579)
1. Rock & Roll Soul - 3:28
2. We're An American Band - 3:23
3. Walk Like A Man (You Can Call Me Your Man) - 3:22
4. BadTime - 2:54
5. Some Kind Of Wonderful - 3:48
6. The Loco-Motion - 2:44
7. Shinin' On - 3:24
8. Sally - 3:12
9. Take Me - 4:04
10. To Get Back In - 3:53

Other Info:
Producers: Grand Funk, Todd Rundgren, Jimmy Ienner

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22
Caught In The Act - 1975 - 13 Tracks, by Capitol (11445)
1. Footstompin' Music - 4:07
2. Rock 'n Roll Soul - 4:04
3. Closer To Home - 7:08
4. Heartbreaker - 7:22
5. Some Kind Of Wonderful - 4:14
6. Shinin' On - 5:31
7. The Loco-motion - 3:21
8. Black Licorice - 4:27
9. The Railroad - 6:13
10. We're An American Band - 3:38
11. T.N.U.C. - 9:32
12. Inside Looking Out - 12:24
13. Gimme Shelter - 7:00

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Harp, Organ, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Percussion, Vocals
Lorraine Feather: Backing Vocals
Craig Frost: Keyboards, Percussion, Vocals
Jana: Backing Vocals
Mel Schacher: Bass, Vocals

Producer: Jimmy Ienner

Reviews:
By 1975, Grand Funk Railroad had reached a new level of fame and fortune thanks to pop-friendly albums like We're an American Band and Shinin' On. However, they had not dropped the turbo-charged rock & roll that built their early success and that fact is proven by this exciting double-live album. Caught in the Act covers all the highlights of their catalog up to that point, including both the major hits and a generous sampling of album-track favorites. All the songs benefit from the amped-up live atmosphere and several improve over the studio versions thanks to the consistent high level of energy that the band pours into each tune. The best example is the latter phenomenon one-two punch of the albums' opening tracks: "Footstompin' Music" leaps out of the speakers with a galloping beat and pulsing organ that effortlessly outstrips its album version, then the band smoothly segues into a barnstorming, revamped version of "Rock 'N' Roll Soul" that tacks an infectious "Nothin' but a party" chant onto the song's beginning. Even the hits add new frills that keep them feeling like rote run-throughs: "The Loco Motion" is soulfully fleshed out by the addition of female backing vocals and hard rock muscle applied to "Black Licorice" transforms it into a speedy, fist-pumping rocker. Another big highlight is the atmospheric version of "Closer to Home," which sports a tighter, more complex arrangement than its studio counterpart and makes an excellent showcase for Craig Frost's skills on a variety of keyboard (he nimbly recreates the song's orchestral coda with an elegant performance on the Mellotron). The end result is a live album that is the equal of the studio's best studio-recorded outings. Simply put, Caught in the Act is a necessity for Grand Funk Railroad fans and may even attract non-fans with its effective combination of energy and instrumental firepower. ~ Donald A. Guarisco, All Music Guide

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21
All The Girls In The World Beware - 1974 - 10 Tracks, by Capitol (11356)
1. Responsibility - 3:50  
2. Runnin' - 4:19
3. Life - 4:58
4. Look At Granny Run Run - 2:29
5. Memories - 3:31
6. All The Girls In The World Beware - 3:29
7. Wild - 2:53  
8. Good & Evil - 7:32
9. Bad Time - 2:54
10. Some Kind Of Wonderful - 3:22

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Percussion, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Percussion, Vocals
Craig Frost: Organ, Keyboards, Percussion, Vocals
Mel Schacher: Bass

Producer: Jimmy Ienner

Reviews:
Grand Funk Railroad continued to move further into the pop/rock mainstream with this hit album. They are aided considerably in this aim by the ultra-slick production of Jimmy Ienner, a producer best known for his work with the Raspberries: songs like "Runnin'" and "Memories" boast rich yet punchy horn and string arrangements that beef up the group's sound without softening its energetic edge. The album's combination of high-gloss production and the band's energy resulted in some impressive hits: "Some Kind of Wonderful" is an exuberant, organ-drenched soul song that highlight's the group's strong harmonies while "Bad Time" mixes a delicate, string-laden melody with a pulsing beat from the rhythm section to create a one-of-a-kind power ballad. None of the other songs on All the Girls in the World Beware have hooks as compelling as these hits, but they are energetically performed and often push the band's sound in interesting new directions: "Memories" is a moody ballad with a country-styled melody and the title track is a humorous portrait of a would-be lady-killer delivered over a funky Santana-esque jam driven by lightning-fast organ riffs and congas. "Good and Evil" is another big surprise, a moody mid-tempo track whose creepy distorted vocals and gothic organ effects create a sound reminiscent of mid-'70s Alice Cooper. In the end, casual listeners would probably be better off seeking this album's hits on a compilation, but All the Girls in the World Beware will definitely appeal to any Grand Funk Railroad fan who enjoyed We're an American Band or Shinin' On. ~ Donald A. Guarisco, All Music Guide

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29
Monumental Funk - 1974 - 6 Tracks, by Quadico (QLP-7401)
1. We Gotta Have Love - 4:11
2. Hey Everybody - 3:37
3. I've Got News for You - 4:47
4. Come See About Me - 4:16
5. Harlem Shuffle - 5:22
6. Love Lights - 7:06

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Harmonica, Keyboards, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Vocals

Reviews:
Mark Farner calls this a bootleg put out by the people at the original label who released music by Terry Knight & the Pack, a company called Lucky Eleven; but bootleg or no, Monumental Funk is an amazing record that Don Brewer and Mark Farner have every right to be very proud of. While Grand Funk Railroad's manager, Terry Knight, may have been a fine producer and a marketing genius, his own efforts at songwriting and singing were the worst aspects of the Pack. Here Farner and Brewer absolutely shine, their version of "Harlem Shuffle" more fun than the hit version by the Rolling Stones. When Don Brewer formed Flint and released a disc on Columbia in 1978, he covered the Supremes' "Back in My Arms Again." Here Mark Farner trumps him with "Come See About Me," a great non-Motown version by these Michigan boys. Farner's original, "We Gotta Have Love," is worthwhile, as is the tremendous rendition of "Hey Everybody." Yes, this record was released to cash in on the fame of Grand Funk Railroad, and there is even a picture disc version of it. The release of this music made the boys in the band angry, but there is a silver lining. Monumental Funk shows that Grand Funk Railroad was no fluke and that Mark Farner was a major talent before Capitol Records signed him and brought him to the attention of millions of fans. ~ Joe Viglione, All Music Guide

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20
Shinin' On - 1974 - 9 Tracks, by Capitol (11278)
1. Shinin' On - 5:59
2. To Get Back In - 3:56  
3. The Loco-motion - 2:46
4. Carry Me Through - 5:34
5. Please Me - 3:37
6. Mr. Pretty Boy - 3:08
7. Gettin' Over You - 3:59
8. Little Johnny Hooker - 4:59  
9. Destitute and Losin' - 7:03

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Guitaron, Harmonica, Organ, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Percussion, Vocals
Craig Frost: Organ, Clavinet, Moog, Piano, Mellotron, Vocals
Todd Rundgren: Guitar
Mel Schacher: Bass

Producer: Todd Rundgren

Reviews:
After racking up their biggest success to date with We're an American Band, Grand Funk Railroad decided to keep a good thing going by retaining Todd Rundgren as their producer and continuing to push their sound in a pop/rock direction. The end result has its moments but is not as strong as We're an American Band. Although the songs are tight and benefit from a strong performance by the group, the material simply isn't as inspired this time out: songs like "Please Me" and "Getting Over You" are energetic but lack the infectious hooks and clever arrangement touches that would make them stick in the listener's memory. Shinin' On's best songs are the ones that became its single releases: the title track infuses its hard-driving, spacy rock groove with some surprisingly ethereal vocal harmonies and the cover of "The Loco Motion" turns this dance classic on its ear with a stomping beat and a screeching guitar lead from Mark Farner. Other tracks make up for their lack of hooks by experimenting with the group's sound in interesting ways: "Mr. Pretty Boy" is a creepy slow blues that features an atmospheric Mellotron backing and "To Get Back In" is a full-fledged soul song built on thick combination of organ and horns. In the end, Shinin' On is too unfocused and uneven to win over non-fans but Grand Funk Railroad fans will find plenty to enjoy on this album. ~ Donald A. Guarisco, All Music Guide

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19
We're An American Band - 1973 - 8 Tracks, by Capitol (11207)
1. Creepin' - 7:01  
2. The Railroad - 6:07  
3. Black Licorice - 4:43
4. Lonliest Rider - 5:19
5. Walk Like A Man - 4:03
6. Ain't Got Nobody - 4:19
7. Stop Lookin' Back - 4:51
8. We're An American Band - 3:25

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Electric Piano, Conga, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Percussion, Vocals
Craig Frost: Organ, Clavinet, Moog, Electric Piano
Mel Schacher: Bass

Producer: Todd Rundgren

Reviews:
The first Grand Funk album produced by Todd Rundgren, this one, of course, includes the hit title track. While that song is truly an American rock anthem, it is really only part of the picture on display here. While that track, and several others, continue on in the hard-rocking straight-ahead tradition of the group, there are less typical cuts here that really are what make this album such a must-have. In addition to the change of producers, this album is the first that includes a four-piece lineup with a keyboardist added to the trio. The tracks that really shine here are the ones that show off that lineup change. Among them are the extended jam "Creepin'." The real showstopper, though, is the Native American-influenced "Loneliest Rider." That number alone is worth the price of admission and will have you scrambling for the repeat button on your remote. When you combine moments like that with a great, consistent hard rock groove texture that the band carries through from their previous releases is in their catalog this is truly one of GFR's strongest releases. ~ Gary Hill, All Music Guide

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35
Funk Off: Mark, Don & Terry, 1966-67 - 1972 - 20 Tracks, by ABKCO
1. Satisfaction -  
2. Dimestore Debutante -  
3. The Shut In -  
4. I've Been Told -  
5. Numbers -  
6. Got Love -  
7. Lady Jane -  
8. Love Godess Of Sunset Strip -  
9. Dirty Lady -  
10. I (Who Have Nothing) -  
11. Lizabeth Peach -  
12. Forever And A Day -  
13. Bad Boy -  
14. Mister, You're A Better Man Than I -  
15. Love, Love, Love, Love -  
16. This Precious Time -  
17. Lovin' Kind -  
18. Come With Me -  
19. A Change On The Way -  
20. One Monkey Don't Stop No Show -  

Other Info:
 
Reviews:
This 21-song double LP does not include everything by Terry Knight & the Pack, missing some early pre-"Mr. You're a Better Man Than I" singles and other stray tracks. However, it does contain the bulk of their output, including their best-known singles: "Mr. You're a Better Man Than I," "I (Who Have Nothing)," "A Change on the Way," "This Precious Time," and "Numbers." Judging from the contents, Knight's strategy largely consisted of trying to ride a bandwagon by imitating specific trends or artists of the day, either with cover versions or (more often) his own retreads of ideas already proven successful in the marketplace. Over the course of two albums, the march of ready comparisons becomes almost comical. "Dimestore Debutante?" "Like a Rolling Stone"-era Bob Dylan. "I've Been Told?" The Rolling Stones' "Play With Fire." "Numbers?" The Count Five's "Psychotic Reaction" with a dash of Paul Revere and the Yardbirds' "Shapes of Things." "Dirty Lady?" Donovan. (Somehow Knight's Lovin' Spoonful mimic, the B-side "What's on Your Mind," escaped inclusion, although you can hear it on Michigan Nuggets, a bootleg compilation of obscure '60s Michigan rock.) "Forever and a Day?" Broadway musicals, believe it or not. That's not to say this anthology is terrible. The records were well-produced, and the playing competent (although the annotation does not make it clear which tracks might be Terry Knight solo, without the Pack). And "A Change on the Way," a minor-key folk-rocker with a utopian '60s message of a new evolutionary dawn approaching, is actually pretty good, even if it was no doubt contrived. Although this out-of-print comp is hard to find, it's probably the easiest way to hear Knight & the Pack's legacy, since much of their back catalog is tied up in the vaults of Cameo-Parkway, a label which has reissued little of its holdings on CD. That's a shame, as the sound quality and mastering on this vinyl anthology could have been better. Note: the record is titled Funk-Off (Sic) 1966-1967 on the front cover, just Funk-Off on the spine, and Mark, Don & Terry 1966-1967 on the center labels of the LPs, so the collection could be identified under any or all of those titles in discographies. ~ Richie Unterberger, All Music Guide

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17
Mark, Don & Mel - 1972 - 12 Tracks, by Capitol (SABB-11042)
1. Time Machine - 3:40
2. Into The Sun - 6:25
3. Heartbreaker - 6:30
4. Feelin' Alright - 4:25
5. Footstompin' Music - 3:45
6. Paranoid - 7:35
7. Loneliness - 8:30
8. Are You Ready - 3:34
9. Mean Mistreater - 4:40
10. T.N.U.C. - 11:45
11. Inside Lookin' Out - 9:29
12. Closer To Home (I'm Your Captain) - 9:58

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Harmonica, Keyboards, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Vocals
Mel Schacher: Bass, Vocals

Producer: Terry Knight

Reviews:
There is a clear-cut divide in Grand Funk Railroad's material; this chronicles the band's early period under flamboyant manager Terry Knight, who was bound and determined to prove that Grand Funk wa the biggest thing in rock and roll. This collection is a great overview of this period and is suggested for those who don't want to wade through the chaff in order to get the gems. This captures the band when they were mere kids looking to become the monsters they later became. ~ James Chrispell, All Music Guide

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18
Phoenix - 1972 - 10 Tracks, by Capitol (11099)
1. Flight of The Phoenix - 3:40
2. Trying To Get Away - 4:13
3. Someone - 4:05  
4. She Got To Move Me - 4:49
5. Rain Keeps Fallin - 3:27
6. I Just Gotta Know - 3:54
7. So You Won't Have To Die - 3:23  
8. Freedom Is For Children - 6:10
9. Gotta Find Me A Better Day - 4:11
10. Rock and Roll Soul - 3:32

Other Info:
Mark Farner:Guitar, Organ, Harmonica, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Percussion, Vocals
Craig Frost: Organ, Clavinet, Harpsichord, Piano
Doug Kershaw: Violin
Mel Schacher: Bass

Producer: Grand Funk

Reviews:
Having scored four consecutive Top Ten albums in the previous two years, Grand Funk Railroad may not have seemed to casual observers like a band who needed to rise phoenix-like from the ashes, but the title of the band's seventh album referred to its re-emergence after a litigious split from manager/producer Terry Knight. Now, they were producing themselves, and they added organist Craig Frost, credited here as a sideman, though he went on to join the band formally. The biggest change, however, was a musical maturity. After releasing five studio albums in a little over two years, Grand Funk waited more than a year before releasing Phoenix, and in that time they managed to come up with more variety than they had displayed before. "Someone," for example, was a surprisingly gentle ballad, and "Rain Keeps Fallin'" was stronger melodically than most of songwriter Mark Farner's previous efforts. Unlike earlier albums, Phoenix didn't seem like one rudimentary rocker after another, which made it Grand Funk's most listenable album so far. And that's not to say it didn't rock, as the leadoff instrumental, "Flight of the Phoenix," and the Top 40 hit that closed the set, "Rock 'n Roll Soul," demonstrated. Unfortunately, Farner's lyrical abilities had not increased, while his self-importance had. "I Just Gotta Know," "So You Won't Have to Die," and "Freedom Is for Children" all contained political exhortations expressed in simple-minded terms, the worst being "So You Won't Have to Die," in which Farner, later to become a Christian artist, claimed Jesus had spoken to him on the subject of overpopulation. After such cringe-inducing foolishness, the band's return to rocking with "Rock 'n Roll Soul" could only be welcomed. ~ William Ruhlmann, All Music Guide

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16
E Pluribus Funk - 1971 - 7 Tracks, by Capitol (853)
1. Footstompin' Music - 3:48
2. People Let's Stop The War - 5:12
3. Upsetter - 4:27  
4. I Come Tumblin' - 5:40  
5. Save The Land - 4:13
6. No Lies - 3:57
7. Lonliness - 8:38

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Harmonica, Keyboards, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Vocals
Mel Schacher: Bass, Vocals

Producer: Terry Knight

Reviews:
The track "Footstompin' Music" let it be known that this was a much heavier Grand Funk than before (if that was possible) with organ, bass and drums all locked into a slamming groove. The rest of the album went on to show Grand Funk's growing political consciousness with "People Let's Stop The War" and also includes another concert favorite, "Loneliness." ~ James Chrispell, All Music Guide

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15
Survival - 1971 - 7 Tracks, by Capitol (764)
1. Country Road - 4:23
2. All You've Got Is Money - 5:16
3. Comfort Me - 6:47  
4. Feelin' Alright - 4:28
5. I Want Freedom - 6:19  
6. I Can Feel Him In The Morning - 7:15
7. Gimme Shelter - 6:20

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Harmonica, Keyboards, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Vocals
Mel Schacher: Bass, Vocals

Producer: Terry Knight

Reviews:
The cleaned-up production and general absence of sloppiness is the first thing you will notice upon hearing Survival. A surprisingly good album, Survival contains a number of standout cuts, including a cover of the Rolling Stones' "Gimme Shelter." With the devotion their fans showed toward them, it seemed that Grand Funk could do no wrong, and here, they attempted to prove their fans right. ~ James Chrispell, All Music Guide

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13
Closer To Home - 1970 - 8 Tracks, by Capitol (471)
1. Sin's A Good Man's Brother - 4:49  
2. Aimless Lady - 3:28
3. Nothing Is The Same - 5:13
4. Mean Mistreater - 4:25
5. Get It Together - 5:07
6. I Don't Have To Sing The Blues - 4:37
7. Hooked On Love - 7:12
8. I'm Your Captain - 9:58  

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Harmonica, Keyboards, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Vocals
Mel Schacher: Bass, Vocals

Producer: Terry Knight

Reviews:
This is the trio's fourth album and the record that really broke them through to a more commercially successful level of metal masters such as Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath. Rather than rushing headlong back into their typical hard, heavy, and overamplified approach, Grand Funk Railroad began expanding their production values. Most evident is the inclusion of strings on the album's title track, the acoustic opening on the disc's leadoff cut, "Sins a Good Man's Brother," as well as the comparatively mellow "Mean Mistreater." But the boys had far from gone soft. The majority of Closer to Home is filled with the same straight-ahead rock & roll that had composed their previous efforts. The driving tempo of Mel Schacher's viscous lead bass lines on "Aimless Lady" and "Nothing Is the Same" adds a depth when contrasted to the soul-stirring and somewhat anthem-like "Get It Together." The laid-back and slinky "I Don't Have to Sing the Blues" also continues the trend of over-the-top decibel-shredding; however, instead of the excess force of other bands, such as MC5, Grand Funk Railroad are able to retain the often-elusive melodic element to their heavy compositions. ~ Lindsay Planer, All Music Guide

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14
Live Album - 1970 - 11 Tracks, by Capitol (1633)
1. Introduction - 2:07
2. Are You Ready - 3:33
3. Paranoid - 7:17
4. In Need - 10:32
5. Heartbreaker - 7:11
6. Inside Looking Out - 12:53
7. Words Of Wisdom - 0:46
8. Mean Mistreater - 4:58
9. Mark Says Alright - 5:12
10. T.N.U.C. - 11:05
11. Into The Sun - 11:08

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Harmonica, Keyboards, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Vocals
Mel Schacher: Bass, Vocals

Producer: Terry Knight

Reviews:
Either you love or you hate it. Live Album by Grand Funk Railroad was a smash when released and those who loved it played it to death. A hard rock phenomenon of the waning days of the Sixties, Grand Funk proved over and over that they were the live performing act of the time, and this album is a testament to their in-concert power. ~ James Chrispell, All Music Guide

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12
Grand Funk - 1969 - 8 Tracks, by Capitol (406)
1. Got This Thing On The Move - 4:40
2. Please Don't Worry - 4:20  
3. High Falootin' Woman - 3:02
4. Mr. Limousine Driver - 4:27
5. In Need - 7:54
6. Winter And My Soul - 6:39  
7. Paranoid - 7:52
8. Inside Looking Out - 9:31

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Harmonica, Keyboards, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Vocals
Mel Schacher: Bass, Vocals

Producer: Terry Knight

Reviews:
Grand Funk Railroad's 1970 somewhat eponymous album, their second for Capitol, is characteristic of the classic rock radio sound that would permeate the airwaves of the late 20th century. Grand Funk Railroad was a seminal force in giving the friendlier side of the heavy-rock sound its charm and making it stick. Built on fuzzed-out blues riffs, simple lyrics, and at times seemingly unnecessary jamming, Grand Funk's songs are mild in nature. Far less extreme than Black Sabbath, but slightly toothier than Foghat or Bad Company, Grand Funk's major influence is from the loose, blues-based power trio formula of bands such as Cream and the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Grand Funk combines rawness with radio-friendly melodies and vocal harmonies that would become their trademark sound. Hordes of bands to come, from Foreigner to Bon Jovi, would emulate Grand Funk's sound and style, focusing on good-time rocking material while attempting a few token social commentary pieces. This is a good album as far as early hard rock goes, and as Grand Funk Railroad would move farther and farther away from the type of roughness and loose arrangements found here, it is well worth picking up as an example of one of their early efforts. ~ Jeff Schwachter, All Music Guide

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11
On Time - 1969 - 10 Tracks, by Capitol (307)
1. Are You Ready - 3:28
2. Anybody's Answer - 5:17  
3. Time Machine - 3:45
4. High On A Horse - 2:56
5. T.N.U.C - 8:42
6. Into The Sun - 6:29
7. Heartbreaker - 6:35
8. Call Yourself A Man - 3:05  
9. Can't Be Too Long - 6:34
10. Ups And Downs - 5:01

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar, Harmonica, Keyboards, Vocals
Don Brewer: Drums, Vocals
Mel Schacher: Bass, Vocals

Producer: Terry Knight

Reviews:
Grand Funk Railroad's 1969 debut is a wildly uneven affair. Although the exuberant energy and power-trio theatrics that would fuel their 1970s hits are in place, the group's songwriting and arranging abilities are very much in their infancy. The biggest problems in terms of songwriting are the often-amateurish lyrics: "Anybody's Answer" is a sincere but muddled attempt at a message song that expends a lot of energy without ever focusing on a particular target and "Heartbreaker" is a love lament that is content to trot out a series of well-worn heartbreak clichés. In terms of arrangements, the band often places an aimless jam where a tight instrumental break should be. The standout example of this problem is "TNUC," a loose-limbed tune that wears out its welcome with an overlong and unstructured drum solo. Despite these problems, there are some strong tunes in the mix: "Are You Ready" is an exuberant rocker built on one of Mel Schacher's trademark walking bass lines and "Into the Sun" is a clever tune that starts as a mellow mid-tempo jam before blossoming into a stomping rocker with a funky guitar riff. Both of these sturdy tunes appropriately became mainstays of Grand Funk Railroad's live show for many years to come. "Time Machine" is another highlight, a bluesy shuffle built on Mark Farner's wailing vocals and a catchy, stuttered guitar riff. All in all, On Time is way too patchy of an album to please the casual listener but provides a few hints of and contains enough worthwhile moments to please the group's fans. ~ Donald A. Guarisco, All Music Guide

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33
Terry Knight & the Pack - 1966 - 12 Tracks, by Cameo/Parkway, Lucky Eleven
1. Numbers - 2:25
2. What's on Your Mind - 1:45
3. Where Do You Go - 3:05
4. Mister, You're a Better Man Than I - 2:48
5. Lovin' Kind - 2:50
6. Shut-In - 3:10
7. Got Love - 3:05
8. Change on the Way - 3:15   Listen with Real Audio
9. Lady Jane - 2:53
10. Sleep Talking - 3:02
11. I've Been Told - 2:20
12. I (Who Have Nothing) - 3:05

Other Info:
Mark Farner: Guitar (Bass), Vocals
Bobby Caldwell: Vocals, Bells, Organ
Don Brewer: Drums, Vocals
Herman Jackson: Guitar (Bass)
Curt Johnson: Vocals, Guitar
Terry Knight: Harpsichord, Vocals, Harmonica, Piano
Richard Rome: String Arrangement

Producer: Terry Knight
Engineers: Joel Fein, Vlad Malakar & Don White

Reviews:
Clear evidence that Grand Funk Railroad was more musical than the critics of the day would have one believe is found in the grooves of Reflections, a dozen songs released on Cameo/Parkway as a follow-up to Terry Knight the Pack's self-titled debut on the Cameo/Parkway-distributed Lucky Eleven label. Terry Knight still can't sing, but he does a better job than Lord Sutch the second time around. Engineered by the brilliant Joe Tarsia, with orchestration arranged and conducted by Richard Rome, the worst thing about this album, as with the band's debut, is the voice of Knight. Interesting Spanish guitar flavors canvas the ballad "Dirty Lady," while tired '60s "yeah yeah's" resonate throughout "Love Goddess of the Sunset Strip." Terry Knight's absolute lack of talent really helps one appreciate his contemporaries, Sky Saxon, Rudy Martinez, Alex Chilton, and especially Don Brewer and Mark Farner. Listen to the legit bootleg Monumental Funk to really hear how tremendous this band is without the producer and alleged singer. Side one is not nearly as embarrassing as what follows; "Forever a Day," for example, is a dreadful quasi-nursery rhyme. Knight may be more on key here than on the previous disc, but his insincerity comes through loud and clear. The label has a copyright of 1963; however, with the presence of 1965's "I Can't Get No Satisfaction," it's safer to say this is late 1966, early 1967. The version of the Rolling Stones' classic actually hints at what Grand Funk would become, especially during their Survival period. A strange amalgam of the Mysterians meets Vanilla Fudge by way of a subdued Blue Cheer makes for a unique rendition of what was considered sacred territory. Again, the worst aspect of this rather interesting piece is the presence of Terry Knight. When one listens to Monumental Funk and hears the potential of the group without their leader, and the Flint album from 1978, which is the band without Mark Farner and way past the influence of Terry Knight, Farner emerges as the true talent that Knight was able to market more successfully than his other groups: Bloodrock and Mom's Apple Pie. "One Monkey Don't Stop No Show" is a far cry from the Honey Cone's 1971 hit of the same name, and "Love, Love, Love, Love, Love" is just downright ridiculous, despite the smart playing of the band behind this attempt at being the Animals. David Bowie did it better years later when he turned this same riff into Jean Genie. But give the devil his due -- Terry Knight created good-sounding records and this was the foundation of Grand Funk Railroad. "Come With Me" is a combination of the Rolling Stones' "Play With Fire" and a song covered on the debut LP by the Pack, "Lady Jane." The version of Sloan/Barri's "This Precious Time" is interesting, and "Anybody's Apple Tree" would be passable if not for the hokey ending. A historical document which can't exactly be called a fun listening experience, but it does hint at the talent that was soon to emerge. - Joe Viglione, All Music Guide

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